Measure 56

Legislative Argument in Support

Ballot Measure 56 restores fairness to Oregon's elections. Elections should be decided by a majority of voters. While this may seem like the most basic tenet of our democracy, it is not always the case in Oregon.

Since 1996, thousands of Oregonians have had their votes thrown out by the undemocratic double majority law. Parents supporting schools, fire fighters who need a new engine, sheriffs who need more resources to fight meth, veterans, libraries, and community colleges have all been stung by the double majority – even though a majority of voters supported their cause.

In May 2006, Tillamook County lost valuable dollars for veteran services despite the fact that the yes votes exceeded the no votes almost two to one. In May 2005, the Lower McKay Fire District had a levy fail due to double majority because 7 people did not vote.

When the double majority law was enacted, supporters argued that local bond campaigns could "sneak" by the voters by holding an election at an unusual time. Today in every bond or levy election each voter receives a ballot envelope clearly marked "Contains vote on proposed tax increase." Voters who do not participate in these elections should not be allowed to determine the outcome.

The Legislature has developed a balanced plan that is supported by Democrats and Republicans to exempt all primary and general elections from this rule. This compromise approach still leaves the double majority in place for those elections in March and September which typically have lower participation.

The fact remains that the law as it stands is undemocratic, and it gives undue power to those who do not participate in our democracy. Our solution presents a moderate middle ground which gives power back to those who take the time to vote.

Committee Members: Appointed by:
Senator Richard Devlin President of the Senate
Representative Vicki Berger Speaker of the House
Representative Dave Hunt Speaker of the House

(This Joint Legislative Committee was appointed to provide the legislative argument in support of the ballot measure pursuant to ORS 251.245.)


Argument in Favor

MAKE EVERY VOTE COUNT

STOP NON-VOTERS FROM SILENCING YOUR VOICE

Join Oregon's Educators in Voting Yes on Measure 56

For years, Oregonians who opted to sit out an election have been determining the outcome of local elections. This is fundamentally unfair. And it's time for a change.

Oregon voters who take the time to make their voice heard shouldn't be silenced by "no-shows." The current system of counting "no-shows" is not only unfair, it's outdated - with Oregon's vote-by-mail system, there is no excuse not to cast a ballot.

We shouldn't continue to let non-voters cancel out the votes of those who care enough about our local communities to cast a ballot. That's not democracy in action! Restore democracy in Oregon. Vote Yes on Measure 56.

Oregon educators work hard every day to inspire young minds and help create good citizens. We encourage students to make their voice heard and we would never punish a student if their classmates chose to sit it out. Oregon's outdated voting system sets a bad example for our kids.

Please join the 48,000 teachers, school employees and community college faculty of the Oregon Education Association in voting Yes on Ballot Measure 56.

MAKE SURE YOUR VOTE COUNTS

Vote Yes on 56

(This information furnished by Larry Wolf, President, Oregon Education Association.)


Argument in Favor

Oregon PTA Urges You to Vote YES on Measure 56
Let's Set a Good Example for Our Kids

As parents who are involved in the education of our children, we make great efforts to teach our kids about basic ideas like fairness, honesty, and the importance of participating in our local communities. These are the foundations of healthy communities, and they're the building blocks of a successful democracy.

That's Why Measure 56 is So Important. Right now, Oregon law is setting a terrible example for our children. The "double majority" requirement means that people who don't care enough to participate in their communities by voting are given the same vote as the people who care enough to vote.

That's teaching our kids that when they get to voting age, they don't even need to bother to vote. If they stay home and never bother to even open their ballot, they'll still get counted as a No vote.

If You Want to Have a Voice, You Have to Show Up. Measure 56 will set things right again by showing our kids that voting is one of the most important things they can do to help their communities and neighborhoods.

In order to show our children the value of participating in their communities, we need to set a good example by passing Measure 56, which restores the basic principle that we shouldn't reward no-shows.

Vote YES on Measure 56.
It Just Makes Sense.

(This information furnished by Anita Olsen, Oregon PTA.)


Argument in Favor

Oregon Fire Fighters Believe in Fairness.
Join Us in Voting Yes on Measure 56.

Oregon's fire fighters believe that you should have the right to vote on the issues that affect your community, and that when you vote, your voice should be counted.

But as it currently stands, in many local elections someone who doesn't even cast a ballot can cancel out your vote—without even lifting a finger. The "double majority" requirement means that non-voters can squash your voice by simply not even showing up.

Measure 56 will set things right.

We believe it's high time your vote be counted fully in every election. Measure 56 will restore the basic democratic principle that elections are decided by those who show up, not by non-voters.

As fire fighters, we give our all everyday. We don't have the option of not showing up when we're needed. It's time for Oregon's election system to stop rewarding no-shows at the ballot by giving them the power to overrule the voices of voters.

Vote YES on Measure 56
Because Voting Matters.

Oregon State Fire Fighters Council

(This information furnished by Kelly Bach, Oregon State Fire Fighters Council.)


Argument in Favor

Join Stand for Children in Standing for Fairness

And Say YES to Measure 56

Right now, you're participating in one of the most vital processes Oregonians have for making an impact in their communities. By using the Voters' Pamphlet to research the issues, and then casting your ballot before Election Day, you're actively making your voice heard.

But right now, there's someone who isn't making any of that effort. They may not even look at their ballot, and they won't bother filling it out and sending it in. And in certain local elections, that person will cancel out your vote.

Measure 56 will amend Oregon's outdated rules on local measures, which allow non-voters to have as much say as the people who vote.

It's common sense that elections should be decided by a majority of those who vote. Measure 56 will restore that fairness to local elections.

This fairness matters for kids and schools. Local communities and schools deserve to be able to come up with local funding solutions that meet their needs. And if a majority of voters approves, those local solutions should become law. If a majority disapproves, they shouldn't.

Non-voters shouldn't have the sole power to make decisions that affect the rest of the community, without even showing up. Local elections should encourage our children to participate fully, not convince them that voting doesn't matter.

Vote YES for Fairness.
Vote YES on Measure 56.

Stand for Children

(This information furnished by Jonah Edelman, Stand for Children.)


Argument in Favor

The Oregon Council of Police Associations
Supports Measure 56

The Oregon Council of Police Associations, representing county and city public safety officers including city police, sheriff deputies and community corrections officers, as well as parole and probation officers, urges you to vote "yes" on Ballot Measure 56.

Measure 56 will make sure voters get a say on public safety issues that matter to them.

Measure 56 puts the power of the vote back in the hands of voters, by amending the current unfair double-majority requirement, which allows people who don't cast their ballots to still count as much as voters who do make the effort to participate.

The current system is unfair. It is simply not fair that certain local elections count people who don't bother to vote as "no" votes, giving non-voters as much say about funding local public safety efforts—like fighting meth abuse and identity theft—as people who care enough about their communities to fill out and send in their ballots. Oregonians who choose to vote should have the say, not those who decide not to participate.

Measure 56 preserves basic democracy. Under Measure 56, a majority of voters will still have to approve local measures before they become law—as it should be. But non-voters will no longer have the power to block the will of the majority.

Join us in restoring fairness to our elections.
Vote "yes" on Measure 56.

The Oregon Council of Police Associations

(This information furnished by Bill Cornell, Board Member, Lane Co., Oregon Council of Police Associations.)


Argument in Favor

It's not hard to vote in Oregon. We benefit from vote-by-mail and a two-week "Election Day." In fact, right now you are in the process of making your decisions and doing your duty to vote. So why should we let someone that isn't going to vote have more power than you?

Support Measure 56 and make your vote count as it should.

Right now in Oregon when certain types of levies go to the ballot to fund things like schools, public safety and library services, the people that don't vote can have a bigger impact on the election than you do. If there isn't a high enough voter turnout then these measures fail — regardless if everyone of those who voted, voted yes. This isn't right. The people that show up should count for something.

Elections don't sneak up on anyone here in Oregon. You get your ballot in the mail. No one is trying to slide an election behind your back to build safe schools for our kids or make sure we have enough jail beds to keep criminals off the streets. This measure will allow a simple majority to decide elections in all May and November elections.

Elections should be about the will of the majority. It should be a simple majority of folks that care enough to fill out their ballot and mail it in, just like you are in the process of doing. The elections results should never be held hostage to those that just don't care enough to vote.

Oregon AFSCME Council 75 (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) supports Measure 56 and we hope that you will, too. Don't let the people too lazy to vote decide our priorities in this state.

Vote Yes! on Measure 56.

(This information furnished by Joe Baessler, Oregon AFSCME Council 75.)


Argument in Favor

Oregon Business Association Says Yes to Measure 56

It's simple: Measure 56 will ensure that measures approved by the majority of participating voters pass. Under the current double majority system, measures supported by a majority of voters are failing, which violates the basic principles of fairness and democracy.

It's time to support Measure 56.

Measure 56 will make sure that voters' voices are heard. With the double majority requirement, people who don't vote have just as much power as the people who care enough about their communities to cast a vote.

For our schools and communities, it's time to support Measure 56.

Oregon businesses urge you to Vote Yes on Measure 56.

Ryan Deckert
Oregon Business Association

Julia Brim-Edwards
Oregon Business Association Board member
Nike, Inc.

Marcy Eastham
Regional Government Affairs Manager
Hewlett Packard Company

(This information furnished by Ryan Deckert, Oregon Business Association.)


Argument in Favor

The American Federation of Teachers-Oregon Says
YES to Measure 56

Elections Should Be Decided By Those Who Vote

Under the current system in Oregon, many important local elections are decided not by the people who participate and vote, but instead by those who stay home and don't even bother. Oregon's outdated "double majority" rule means that people who don't vote can override the wishes of the majority of voters.

Measure 56 will restore the basic democratic principle that elections are decided by a majority of the people who vote. It's common sense, the kind of logical principle that we teach our students every day. If you want to have a say, you have to voice your opinion and get involved.

The "double majority" is an outdated relic from a bygone era. With Oregon's unique Vote By Mail system, there's simply no reason why registered voters can't participate. The ballot comes directly to us, and we have two weeks to research the issues and cast our votes.

Good ideas that support local communities shouldn't be penalized by non-voters' apathy.

Please join the 11,000 members of the
American Federation of Teachers-Oregon
in
Voting YES on Ballot Measure 56.

(This information furnished by Mark Schwebke, President, American Federation of Teachers- Oregon.)


Argument in Favor

Join Governor Kulongoski In Voting
Yes Vote on Measure 56
STOP LETTING A NO-SHOW CANCEL YOUR VOTE

Dear Oregon Voter:

I believe that voting is both a right and a responsibility. If you're reading this, you probably do too. But Oregon's voting system is flawed. Currently, a no-show, someone who doesn't even bother to vote, cancels your vote and your voice. That's outrageous. It's unfair, it's bad policy and it doesn't make sense.

That is why I'm asking you to vote Yes on Measure 56.

Measure 56 will restore fairness in Oregon elections. It will allow local communities to decide what is best for them based on the will of the voters who take the time to cast a ballot.

You are taking the time to read the Voters' Pamphlet.
You are concerned about the future of your community.
You vote in local elections because you care.

And your voice deserves to be heard. We can't continue to let someone who doesn't bother to vote cancel out any "yes" vote you cast on a measure important to the health of your local community. Whether it's for police and fire protection, a new school building or better libraries, the no-show wins –and the community loses.

You have the right to make decisions about your community. Let's end the flawed policy of letting people who don't even show up interfere with the voting process.

Let's bring back democracy in Oregon. Vote Yes on Measure 56.

Oregon faces many future challenges: improving our roads, our schools and our environment. Let's make sure that every vote counts and every voice is heard.

Vote Yes on Measure 56: It's the right thing to do for your community.

Sincerely,

Ted Kulongoski
Governor

(This information furnished by Governor Ted Kulongoski.)


Argument in Favor

Join Us in Voting YES on Measure 56

Because Your Vote is Your Voice

The most basic principle in democracy is a simple one: Whoever gets the most votes wins. It's an idea that even elementary school students understand—and it's why voting is one of the most important things citizens can do.

And yet, under the current system in certain local elections, no-shows count. That means people who don't even bother to vote can determine the outcome of an election. This crazy system gives people who don't care enough to vote as much of a voice as the people who care enough about their communities to cast their ballot.

That isn't fair, and it's not the way our democracy was meant to work.

Measure 56 will restore fairness to local elections by restoring the premise that elections are determined by those who vote – not by those who don't.

When you vote in a local election, your vote should not be disregarded simply because others chose not to vote. Non-voters shouldn't be allowed to cancel out your vote, simply by not showing up.

In a democracy, your vote is your voice. Measure 56 will restore your voice and will prevent no-shows from silencing the will of the people.

We urge you to vote YES on Measure 56. Democracy shouldn't reward apathy but rather, it should honor the voices of those who care enough about their communities to participate in the decisions about their future.

Please Vote YES on Measure 56.

Oregon School Employees Association

(This information furnished by Merlene Martin, President, Oregon School Employees Association.)


Argument in Favor

Let Voters Decide!
Measure 56 Gives Power Back to Voters

The Oregon Consumer League was formed many years ago with the goal of protecting Oregon consumers. We believe that all consumers should get a fair shake. We also believe that full consumer protection requires vigilance and participation from average people.

But under current law, vigilant citizens who take the time to vote aren't getting a fair shake in some elections. In fact, the cards are stacked against them and in favor of people who don't even show up to vote!

The "double majority" requirement means that local elections aren't always decided by voters—they're decided by non-voters. As strange as it sounds, in many elections, people who don't vote have more power over elections than the people who do vote.

Not only is this not fair, but it also rewards apathy and non-participation. That's a formula that we cannot support. That's why we're asking you to vote yes on Measure 56.

Elections are our opportunity to participate in our families' "consumer protection" when it comes to new laws.

Measure 56 is the kind of reform that will increase participation and make local elections more fair.

Vote YES on Measure 56.

Oregon Consumer League

(This information furnished by Jim Davis, Oregon Consumer League.)


Argument in Favor

Let's Return Basic Democratic Principles
to Our Elections

Vote YES on Measure 56

Measure 56 Restores Basic Fairness.

Imagine:

Two weeks before Election Day, you receive your ballot in the mail. You read this helpful Voters' Pamphlet, and you consult people you trust for input on how to vote. You even do research online because you want to make sure that you are fully informed when you cast your vote.

Before Election Day, you fill out your ballot and get it in to your county elections office, either by dropping it off or by simply sending it through the mail.

You feel good knowing that you've participated in the voting process. You've done everything you could to make your vote count and make your voice heard.

Now imagine that across town, someone receives their ballot and tosses it aside, letting junk mail and dust pile on top of it. Perhaps they never even open it. On Election Day, they're nowhere to be found.

Because of the state's "double majority" requirement, that person—the one who never bothered to even open their ballot—just canceled out your vote.

How is that possible? Under current law, people who don't vote in local elections are counted as No votes. People who don't even bother to fill out their ballot can cancel your vote.

Measure 56 restores the basic principle that if you want your voice heard, you have to cast your vote. It's that simple.

Vote YES on Measure 56.
Voting Matters.

Oregon School Boards Association
Craig Prewitt, OSBA President and Member, Phoenix-Talent School Board
Annette Mattson, OSBA President-Elect and Member, David Douglas School Board
Beth Gerot, OSBA Vice President and Member, Eugene School Board
Scott B. Pillar, OSBA Secretary-Treasurer and Board Chairman, High Desert ESD
Jeff Sanders, OSBA Past-President and Member, Jefferson 509J School Board

(This information furnished by Michael Novak, Voting Matters.)


Argument in Favor

Elections Should Be About Fairness.
Join the 225,000 members of the Oregon AFL-CIO in
Voting YES on Measure 56.

The working men and women of the Oregon AFL-CIO know that our votes are the most effective way we can all participate in our state and our communities. The basic act of filling out and casting a ballot is supposed to ensure that our voices are heard on the issues that affect us most.

But right now, loopholes in the law allow those who don't even bother to vote to have more of a say in an election than the people who take the time to carefully look at the issues and cast a ballot.

Something needs to change. That's why we're voting YES on Measure 56.

Measure 56 will:

Stop non-voters from canceling out the votes of the people who care enough about their communities to cast a ballot. Currently, elections can be decided by people who don't even show up to vote.

Restore the basic democratic principle that you must vote to have your voice heard. Measure 56 will put local election decisions back into the hands of local voters.

Encourage more voters to cast their ballots. The current system gives non-voters more power than voters—that's not fair and it's not democratic.

Measure 56 is about restoring basic
fairness and democracy.
That's something we can all agree on.

Please join the working men and women of the Oregon AFL-CIO in voting YES on Measure 56.

Oregon AFL-CIO

(This information furnished by Kathryn Grover, Oregon AFL-CIO.)


Argument in Favor

Don't Let Non-Voters Cancel Your Vote.

Vote YES on Measure 56.

Common sense dictates that elections should be decided by a majority of voters. And yet, Oregon's "double majority" requirement means that local measures are frequently shot down if voter turnout is under 50 percent—even if they're supported by a wide majority of voters. That is simply not fair.

Measure 56 puts the democracy back in local elections.

Now that Oregon votes by mail and ballots are delivered right to our homes, the "double majority" requirement is outdated. If there's an election, a ballot is sent to you. Elections shouldn't be decided by the people who can't even be bothered to fill out their ballots and send them in.

Under Measure 56, all elections will still have to be won by a majority of voters. And Measure 56 ensures that non-voters aren't canceling out the ballots of voters.

Measure 56 will mean that all elections are governed by the same simple rules. That's fair, and it's basic democracy.

Please join me in voting YES on Measure 56.

Bobbie Regan, Director, Portland Public School Board

(This information furnished by Bobbie Regan, Director, Portland Public School Board.)


Argument in Favor

Voting Matters.

The League of Women Voters Says
Vote YES on Measure 56.
Your Voice Depends on It.

Measure 56 is About Basic Democracy. Voting is one of the most important and basic things Oregon citizens can do to improve their communities. Our state and our nation are built on the notion that the laws and policies that govern us have the approval of a majority of voters. That's why it's so important to make your voice heard.

But under current Oregon law, people who don't vote in some local elections have the same power to make decisions as the people who do vote. That means that your vote can be canceled by someone who never even bothered to cast a ballot.

Measure 56 is About Fairness and Common Sense. This measure says that voters have the ultimate say in elections. That's a simple concept, and it's simple fairness. If you want your vote to count, you have to make the effort to cast your ballot.

Measure 56 Encourages Participation. Democracy depends on participation, and successful communities depend on an engaged and active citizenry. Measure 56 encourages participation by requiring people to vote in order to have their voices heard.

Vote for Fairness.
Vote YES on Measure 56.

League of Women Voters of Oregon

(This information furnished by Michael Novak, Voting Matters.)


Argument in Favor

Human Services Coalition of Oregon Says
"Yes" to Measure 56

Dear Voter,

The Human Services Coalition of Oregon is made up of organizations and individuals whose mission is to educate and advocate to lawmakers on behalf of the most vulnerable Oregonians, including seniors, children, people with disabilities and low-income residents. We believe in vigorous public debate and participation by voters.

We support Measure 56.
Measure 56 will return power to Oregon voters. It will mean that Oregonians who participate in elections will be the ones to decide on local funding measures that support vital public services for children, seniors, and all citizens.

Measure 56 is fair.
Unlike the current system, Measure 56 is fair to Oregon voters. Measure 56 means that voters who choose to participate have their say in elections.

Measure 56 is democratic.
It's not fair to give non-voters the power to decide an election. That's why we need Measure 56 to ensure that the voices of voters who cast their ballots are heard.

Measure 56 Means Accountability to the People.
Under Measure 56, A majority of voters—50 percent plus one—will still have to approve measures in order for them to become law. But, unlike the current system, no-shows will no longer be counted as voters.

Measure 56 is fair, democratic and the right thing to do.

Please vote "Yes" on Measure 56.

Human Services Coalition of Oregon

(This information furnished by John Mullin, Co-Chair, Human Services Coalition of Oregon.)


Argument in Favor

Voters + Elections = Democracy

Vote YES on Measure 56.

Elections give communities a chance to make our priorities known and have our needs met. Elections also provide community members with a direct way to influence public policy by voting for or against measures that are placed on the ballot.

Successful democracies thrive when people participate, but current Oregon law actually gives people who don't participate as much of a voice as the people who vote. Measure 56 will give power back to voters.

Right now, non-voters can cancel out the voices of voters in certain local elections, due to the outdated "double majority" rule. Even if a local measure has overwhelming support among voters, non-voters can overrule them simply by not showing up. Time and again this has caused critical needs in rural Oregon to go unmet. In these hard times, all voters – and especially rural Oregonians—need the power to take care of our communities.

Oregon elections should empower people and encourage participation. That's why we're voting YES on Measure 56.

At Rural Organizing Project, we're dedicated to organizing community members in all 36 counties in Oregon to participate in the political process. We know that healthy participation in local communities is what makes our democracy strong.

Let's reward that participation, not punish those who take the time to show up.

Vote YES on Measure 56.

Rural Organizing Project

(This information furnished by Amy Dudley, Rural Organizing Project.)


Argument in Favor

Help Kids and Our Local Schools
Vote Yes on Measure 56

Oregon communities support giving our students the help they need by voting to provide our schools with new textbooks, smaller class sizes, teacher training and other basic essentials to give our children a quality education.

But Oregon's current voting system doesn't work. It's outdated and unfair to local communities. Even if a local school measure is supported by the majority of voters who take the time to cast a ballot, it can still fail just because some voters chose not to participate. That's unfair.

As educators, we don't reward students for being absent. We don't let students who fail to participate cancel out the rights of those students who do. Every day we instill in our kids the importance of our great democracy yet Oregon's own voting system is inherently undemocratic.

It's time for a change. Oregonians should support Measure 56 because it restores the rule of one person, one vote. Our kids shouldn't have to suffer because voters sit out local elections.

Voting Matters and Your Vote Should Count.
Join Oregon Teachers in Voting Yes on Measure 56

Chris Wagenet
High School Math Teacher
Central Point, Oregon

Maureen Barnhart
Middle School Math & Science Teacher
Hillsboro School District 1J

(This information furnished by Michael Novak, Voting Matters.)


Argument in Favor

A Simple Answer to a Simple Problem –
Vote Yes on Measure 56

The 51,000 Oregon members of the Service Employees International Union believe that voting is the most basic and important thing you can do as a citizen. We value our opportunity to have our say about the many important issues in every election that can affect our lives. That's why we are supporting Ballot Measure 56.

There are a lot of complicated issues on the ballot this year, but Measure 56 isn't one of them. It's a simple solution to a simple problem that makes our elections fair for everyone.

Vote Yes on Measure 56 – A Simple Solution We Can All Support.

SEIU Local 503

(This information furnished by Arthur Towers, Political Director, SEIU Local 503.)


Argument in Favor

Elections Are About Accountability and Participation
Vote YES on Measure 56

As the Treasurer of the State of Oregon, it's my duty to manage the state's finances prudently and responsibly. In every way possible, we run my office like a business, striving to save taxpayers' money and maximize the state's return on investments.

But protecting the state's finances isn't just the job of the Treasurer—Oregon voters also share much of the responsibility. Voters are frequently asked to make financial decisions about helping their communities, such as funding neighborhood schools and public safety. The most direct and effective way to make sure that local decisions are supported is by a majority of those who vote. It is simple: measures that have a majority of support should pass; those that don't should fail.

But under an outdated Oregon law, people who don't even show up to vote in certain local elections are given just as much power as the people who care enough to cast their ballots.

In no other field—business, charities, your local neighborhood association—are people who choose not to participate given more of a voice than the people who show up. But in certain local elections, Oregon law allows no-shows to be counted as "No" votes, and they can cancel out the voices of the citizens who cast their ballot.

That violates the basic principles of fairness, democracy, and accountability.

Measure 56 will return fairness to local elections, and will ensure that measures that have a majority of support—50 percent plus 1—are enacted.

It's fair, it's responsible, and it's democratic.

Please join me in voting YES on Measure 56.

State Treasurer Randall Edwards

(This information furnished by Michael Novak, Voting Matters.)


Argument in Favor

SUPPORT Measure 56
Because it restores fairness and democracy
to local elections

Here are just some of the groups who support Measure 56:

Oregon AFSCME Council 75
American Federation of Teachers - Oregon
American Association of University Women of Oregon
Anita Olsen, President Oregon PTA
Association of Oregon Corrections Employees
Basic Rights Oregon
Bobbie Regan, Director Portland Public School Board
Chris Wagenet, high school math teacher, Central Point, Oregon
Community Action Partnership of Oregon
Community Alliance of Tenants
Confederation of Oregon School Administrators
Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon
Elders in Action Commission • United Seniors of Oregon
Eugene-Springfield Solidarity Network/Jobs with Justice
Frederick Olson, Co-Chair, Advocacy Coalition of Seniors and People with Disabilities
Governor Ted Kulongoski
Hewlett Packard Company
Human Services Coalition of Oregon (HSCO)
Larry Wolf, President Oregon Education Association
League of Women Voters of Oregon
Maureen Barnhart, middle school math and science teacher, Hillsboro School District 1J
Multnomah County Democrats
Northwest Oregon Labor Council, AFL-CIO
ONE Voice for Child Care
Oregon AFL-CIO
Oregon Alliance for Retired Americans • Save Oregon Seniors
Oregon Association for the Education of Young Children
Oregon Business Association
Oregon Consumer League
Oregon Council of Police Associations
Oregon Education Association
Oregon League of Conservation Voters
Oregon Wild • Oregon Natural Resources Council ACTION
Oregon Nurses Association
Oregon PTA • Stand for Children
Oregon School Boards Association
Oregon School Employees Association
Oregon State Council for Retired Citizens
Oregon State Fire Fighters Council
Oregon State Police Officers Association
Parkinson's Resources of Oregon
Portland Jobs with Justice
PSU Chapter - American Association of University Professors
Representative Diane Rosenbaum
Rural Organizing Project
SEIU Local 49 • SEIU Local 503 • SEIU Oregon State Council
Senator Laurie Monnes Anderson • Senator Suzanne Bonamici
Senator Mark Hass • Senator Richard Devlin
Senator Rod Monroe
State Treasurer Randall Edwards
Tax Fairness Oregon • Working Families Party of Oregon

(This information furnished by Michael Novak, Voting Matters.)


Argument in Favor

The current Double Majority Law is unfair. This law gives greater consideration to non-voters than voters who turn in their ballots. The Double Majority law encourages voter apathy.

The law requiring a double majority needs revision.

The double majority law was instituted before mail-in ballots became the way of voting in Oregon. Mail-in ballots assure that all registered voters receive a ballot for each election. When appropriate, each mail-in ballot has "potential tax increase" printed on the outside envelope, assuring that electors are made aware when an issue affecting their taxes is to be decided.

Local governments, in order to meet community needs and for efficient operation, need the answers to community questions more frequently than every two years. Ballot Measure 56 provides the solution.

Protect your right as an active voter to make decisions about your community's future.

Please join Mayors and city leaders from throughout Oregon, urban and rural, Democrat and Republican and vote YES on Ballot Measure 56.

City leaders who support Ballot Measure 56:

Rob Drake, Mayor of Beaverton
Jim Wright, Council President, City of Damascus
Gary Williams, Mayor of Cottage Grove
Cheryl Young, Mayor of Columbia City
Jim Fairchild, Mayor of Dallas
James L. White, Mayor of Depoe Bay
Robert J. Austin, Mayor of Estacada
Richard C. Kidd, Mayor of Forest Grove
Shanti Platt, Mayor of Gervais
John McArdle, Mayor of Independence
Lori Hollingsworth, Mayor of Lincoln City
Jim Bernard, Mayor of Milwaukie
John Oberst, Mayor of Monmouth
Shirley Kalkhoven, Mayor of Nehalem
Cheri Olson, Mayor of North Plains
Donald E. Hampton, Mayor of Oakridge
Tom Potter, Mayor of Portland
Janet Taylor, Mayor of Salem
Norm King, Mayor of West Linn
Charlotte Lehan, Mayor of Wilsonville

(This information furnished by Marc Miller, City Leaders of Oregon PAC.)


Argument in Favor

The Oregon Library Association
urges "yes" on Measure 56.

(This information furnished by Nan Heim, Oregon Library Association.)