Measure 62

Argument in Favor

We urge you to vote yes on Measure 62, so that Oregon can take a great step forward in crime prevention, investigation, and prosecution.

Measure 62 is a constitutional amendment because the use of lottery profits must be authorized in the constitution.

Measure 62 specifies that 15% of lottery profits shall be used for public safety but it also specifies how those funds should be used. This is important because it prevents the politicians from misdirecting the funds.

50% of the public safety money will fully fund the criminal investigation, forensics, and crime lab operations of the Oregon State Police. This will give us a high-quality investigation system which helps every single police department and sheriff department in the state.

In addition, 20% of the public safety fund goes to counties to support early childhood programs for children who are at risk. This gives the counties money they can direct to meet the most important needs of their own communities to prevent crime.

Next, 15% of the public safety fund strengthens the investigation and field work of county sheriffs.

The final 15% of the public safety fund strengthens the operations of the county district attorneys.

Vote yes on Measure 62 to improve crime prevention, investigation, and prosecution.

Wayne Brady
Duane Fletchall
Kevin Mannix
Directors, Oregon Anti-Crime Alliance

(This information furnished by Wayne Brady, Duane Fletchall and Kevin L. Mannix, Directors, Oregon Anti-Crime Alliance.)


Argument in Favor

I ask you to vote yes on Measure 62 because of the positive effect it will have on crime prevention, investigation, and prosecution.

Some people have inquired about the allocation of lottery money to other purposes and the impact of Measure 62 on those other purposes.

Currently, the constitution guarantees 18% of lottery profits to an education trust fund, and it guarantees 15% of lottery profits for state parks and habitat restoration. The remaining lottery profit is used for job creation, economic development, and education (and for debt service for bond issues for those purposes).

With Measure 62 in place, there is a 15% definite cap on the parks/habitat share of lottery profits. There is also a 15% definite cap on the public safety share of lottery profits. Education has a guaranteed 18% share of lottery profits, but it also gets to share in the rest of lottery profits (unlike the parks/habitat or public safety shares). So, even with Measure 62, up to 70% of lottery profits can go to education.

Public safety is at least as important a priority as state parks/habitat. It should get the same 15% share of lottery profits, and Measure 62 will do this.

Your yes vote will help protect our communities!

Duane Fletchall, Chief Petitioner

(This information furnished by Duane Fletchall, Chief Petitioner.)


Argument in Favor

Vote YES on Measure 62 to improve crime prevention, investigation, and prosecution.

After Oregon voters approved the dedication of 15% of lottery profits to support parks and enhance wildlife habitat, we saw dramatic improvements. Our state parks system has seen the most dynamic growth since the 1940s.

The reason is that parks officials could plan ahead, knowing that politicians could not interfere with a dedicated funding source.

Measure 62 dedicates an equal share - 15% - of lottery profits to a public safety fund. The use of this fund is specified by voters, so politicians cannot divert it or tap into it.

Half the public safety fund will give us a top-quality forensic and crime lab operation, to help law enforcement all over the state. I like to call it "CSI: Oregon."

The other half of the fund goes to counties. The uses are again specified: early childhood programs for children at risk; field work and investigations by sheriffs; and support for district attorneys.

The funding standards guarantee that each county will receive a base level share which will make a real difference in fighting crime.

Vote YES on Measure 62 to give us "CSI: Oregon," to support county programs for children and families, and to better support your sheriff and district attorney.

Kevin L. Mannix
Chief Petitioner

(This information furnished by Kevin L. Mannix, Chief Petitioner.)


Argument in Favor

As a retired Oregon State Police Trooper, I ask you to vote yes on Measure 62 to improve public safety in your community.

One of the greatest advances we have seen in criminal justice is the capability of forensics scientists, backed by crime labs, to use DNA evidence and similar scientific advances to identify criminals and get them convicted - as well as to clear the innocent.

Sadly, whenever funds are tight, one of the first public safety operations to be cut back by the politicians involves the criminal investigation, forensics, and crime lab operations of the Oregon State Police. This has a tremendous negative impact on local law enforcement who depend on these operations for investigations and forensics in more complicated cases. Measure 62 will guarantee a steady funding source to fully fund these investigations and crime lab operations, so Oregon can have a high-quality continuing program on this front.

The other dynamic change with Measure 62 is that it provides dedicated funds to our 36 counties for crime prevention, investigation, and prosecution. Communities will be empowered to decide what works best.

Measure 62 will be especially important to help those counties which have been hit hard by the loss of federal timber revenues. Measure 62 will provide dedicated funds to these counties, so they can at least have a safety net of public safety operations. This is not a complete response to the loss of federal timber revenues, and Measure 62 was not designed to provide such a response. But one of the side benefits to Measure 62 is that hard hit counties will be able to carry on some basic public safety programs.

Vote yes on Measure 62.

Steve Beck
Chief Petitioner

(This information furnished by Steve Beck, Chief Petitioner.)


Argument in Favor

OREGON STATE POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION
ENDORSES MEASURE 62

The Oregon State Police Officers' Association endorses Measure 62.

Our State Police troopers understand the modern challenges of criminal justice. They know we need resources to prevent crime, to investigate crime, and to prosecute crime.

Measure 62 will provide dedicated funds – 15% of Lottery profits – to help reduce crime and hold criminals accountable.

A special aspect of Measure 62 is the dedication of funds to fully operate our crime labs and forensics operations. Today, evidence evaluation and analysis is backed up for months due to lack of staff and equipment.

This leaves us without the capability to promptly and fully apply modern evidence technology, including analysis of DNA evidence.

Delay in criminal investigation means delay in tracking down criminals and putting them out of circulation.

Such delay also means leaving innocent persons "under a cloud."

We need to speed up and improve our crime investigations both to convict the guilty and clear the innocent.

The Oregon State Police Officers' Association understands this. Join them – vote Yes on Measure 62 to improve crime prevention programs but also to improve crime investigation and prosecution.

Steve Beck
Duane Fletchall
Kevin Mannix

Chief Petitioners

(This information furnished by Steve Beck, Duane Fletchall and Kevin Mannix, Chief Petitioners.)


Argument in Favor

VOTE YES ON MEASURE 62 TO CONTINUE AND
IMPROVE BASIC PUBLIC SAFETY SERVICES
THROUGHOUT OREGON USING LOTTERY DOLLARS

MEASURE 62 WILL STOP DEVASTATING CUTS AND
INCREASE PUBLIC SAFETY THROUGHOUT OREGON.

JOIN US IN VOTING YES ON MEASURE 62

Matt Shirtcliff, Baker County
John Haroldson, Benton County
John Foote, Clackamas County District Attorney
Joshua Marquis, Clatsop County
Stephen Atchison, Columbia County
R. Paul Frasier, Coos County
Michael T. Dugan, Deschutes County
Ryan Joslin, Grant County
John Sewell, Hood River County
Mark Huddleston, Jackson County
Peter Deuel, Jefferson County
Stephen Campbell, Josephine County
Edwin Caleb, Klamath County
David Schutt, Lake County
Doug Harcleroad, Lane County
Walter M. Beglau, Marion County
Michael D. Schrunk, Multnomah County
John Fisher, Polk County
Wade M. McLeod, Sherman County
Tim Thompson, Union County District Attorney
Bob Hermann, Washington County
Mona K. Williams, Wallowa County
Brad Berry, Yamhill County

John Bishop, Curry County
Glenn E. Palmer, Grant County
Rob Gordon, Washington County
Jack Crabtree, Yamhill County

(This information furnished by Steve Atchison, Oregon District Attorneys Association.)