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Measure 75

  • Argument in Favor

    VOTE YES ON 75 TO SUPPORT A TAXABLE CASINO
    THAT DEDICATES REVENUE TO OREGON CLASSROOMS

    Vote Yes on Measure 75

    This measure allows a taxable casino in a specific location in Wood Village, Oregon, as part of an entertainment center that includes non-gaming amenities such as a resort hotel, a large hall for concerts and conventions, a 3D movie complex, a bowling center, and indoor and outdoor water parks.

    This measure dedicates 25% of gaming revenues directly to every K-12 public school classroom and to every county in Oregon for public safety, healthcare, libraries, senior services, and more.

    This project will jump-start the Oregon economy and create thousands of construction and permanent jobs that will average $35,000 per year and will include health benefits.

    This would be the first taxable casino in Oregon. (Tribal casinos do not pay taxes.)

    Oregon needs an economic recovery. You can make a difference in the economy and provide needed revenue for schools and for seniors, at no cost to Oregon taxpayers.

    Vote yes for economic recovery.

    Vote yes for more money in the classroom.

    Vote yes to support senior services in every county.

    Vote yes on Measure 75

    www.GoodForOregon.org

    Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioner
    Matthew Rossman, Chief Petitioner
    Good For Oregon Committee

    (This information furnished by Matthew Rossman and Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioners, Good for Oregon Committee.)


    Argument in Favor

    MEASURE 75 DOES NOT NEED A CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGE

    YOU HAVE THE POWER TO SITE THE TAXABLE CASINO

    The prohibition authorizing casinos and the requirement to ban casinos applies only to the Legislative Assembly, not to the people. Ballot Measure 75 will become law when it passes.

    “The Legislative Assembly has no power to authorize, and shall prohibit, casinos from operation in the State of Oregon.”
    -- Oregon Constitution, Article XV, section 4(12)

    The most important evidence of whether Oregon voters intended for the Constitution’s lottery provision to prohibit the voters themselves from authorizing a casino, is what the lottery provision says-- that the Legislative Assembly may not authorize a casino, it doesn’t say the people can’t.

    Leaving “the people” out of the provision is significant for two reasons. First, Oregon law prohibits courts from adding words to laws. ORS 174.010 states: “In the construction of a statute, the office of the judge is simply to ascertain and declare what is, in terms or in substance, contained therein, not to insert what has been omitted, or to omit what has been inserted.” If voters didn’t put the words “the people” into the casino ban, those words can’t be added by the courts.

    Second, other parts of the constitution show that the people knew how to apply a constitutional provision to themselves when they wanted to. There are many provisions of the constitution that prohibit, require, or authorize actions by both the legislature and the people. Some of those provisions are:

    • Article VII (Amended), section 1a (“The Legislative Assembly or the people may by law…”).

    • Article IX, section 1 (“The Legislative Assembly shall, and the people through the initiative may, provide by law…”).

    Leaving “the people” out of the provision demonstrates Oregon voters didn’t intend to prevent themselves from deciding whether to allow a casino.

    THIS WILL BE THE ONLY TAXPAYING CASINO

    Matthew Rossman, Chief Petitioner
    Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioner
    Good For Oregon Committee

    (This information furnished by Matthew Rossman and Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioners, Good for Oregon Committee.)


    Argument in Favor

    MAYOR OF WOOD VILLAGE ASKS YOU TO VOTE YES ON 75

    As Mayor of Wood Village, where the proposed entertainment center will be located, I ask you to vote Yes on Measure 75.

    Oregon owners want to build on the site of the old Multnomah Kennel Club, which is an abandoned dog racing track with easy access to I-84. In its heyday, the race track provided jobs for east Multnomah County and entertainment for locals and visitors. Now the racetrack sits empty, doing nothing for the community or the state.

    The proposed project is more than a casino. The owners have committed to build an entertainment center with a 3D movie theater, water park, convention facilities, concert hall, hotel and other amenities along with a casino. It would provide fun family entertainment and attract tourists to Oregon.

    The entertainment center will be a good neighbor in Wood Village. The owners have met regularly with local officials and are committed to solve any issues related to traffic and crime.

    In addition to this statewide vote, Wood Village voters will vote this November on a local referendum to allow the project. But first, we need the support of voters statewide.

    Why vote yes if you don’t live in Wood Village?

    1. This measure requires 25% of the gaming revenue to go to every school and county in Oregon and the local communities. To see how much money your county or school could receive, visit www.GoodForOregon.org

    2. This project could add to our overall economy, bringing full time jobs and tourists to our state. The casino will pay income, property and payroll taxes totaling hundreds of millions of dollars every year. With your support, we have an opportunity to create jobs that will boost the entire state economy.

    Please vote Yes on Measure 75

    Sincerely,

    Dave Fuller
    Mayor of Wood Village

    (This information furnished by Dave Fuller, Mayor of Wood Village.)


    Argument in Favor

    MEASURE 75 DEDICATES NEW CASINO REVENUE TO
    CLASSROOMS, COPS, COUNTIES AND CITIES

    The state claims it will lose money if this measure passes. But all they’ll lose is control over the money. In truth, this project will generate hundreds of millions more in revenue. But instead of giving the money to the Legislature, this measure gives the spending power to the People.

    Measure 75 dedicates half of its revenue directly to classrooms and divides the other half among Oregon’s 36 counties and 10 largest cities.

    EVERYONE AGREES THAT MEASURE 75 PUTS HUNDREDS OF
    MILLIONS INTO LOCAL SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITIES

    According to the state’s own estimates, the new casino will send:

    BETWEEN $4 MILLION AND $7.5 MILLION to state programs, and

    BETWEEN $40 MILLION AND $74 MILLION TO SCHOOLS YEARLY: Each and every classroom in Oregon will receive money from the casino.

    BETWEEN $37 MILLION AND $67 MILLION TO LOCAL GOVERNMENTS: Some money that previously went to the state will go to counties instead - for important services such as public safety and services for seniors. Local communities will need to borrow less with state bonding if they are getting the revenue directly from the casino. To see how much your county would get, visit www.GoodForOregon.org

    OREGON ALREADY RELIES ON GAMING REVENUE
    TO MEET BASIC BUDGET NEEDS. MEASURE 75 RAISES
    MORE MONEY WITH A NEW TAXABLE CASINO
    AND DEDICATES IT TO OUR PRIORITIES.

    Matthew Rossman, Chief Petitioner
    Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioner
    Good For Oregon Committee

    (This information furnished by Matthew Rossman and Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioners, Good for Oregon Committee.)


    Argument in Favor

    The Columbia Pacific Building Trades Council
    Urges You To Vote Yes On Measure 75

    Oregonians who work with their hands are struggling to find work, but jobs are nowhere to be to be found.

    Depending on the trade, 25% to 50% of construction workers are unemployed.

    But there is hope. Measure 75 asks voters to support building a $250 million dollar entertainment center and taxable casino in Wood Village. The project is expected to create hundreds of direct construction jobs, generating a $286 million in annual payroll over the next several years.

    Measure 75 Will:

    • Create up to 5,000 construction jobs, and
    • Inject hundreds of millions of dollars into Oregon’s economy

    Furthermore, all these construction jobs will come from private investment, not tax dollars.

    There hasn’t been much privately funded work for a long time. This project is an opportunity to get people working. When we are working, we have money to spend in the local economy.

    The builders of this project are committed to building and operating the new casino and resort the Oregon way, constructed by union craftspeople using local suppliers, and incorporating state-of-the-art green building materials and techniques.

    Once the facility is built, it is expected to provide more than 2,000 permanent jobs on site, plus an additional 2,300 indirect jobs from the increase in tourism.

    HELP GET OREGON WORKING AGAIN: VOTE YES ON MEASURE 75

    COLUMBIA PACIFIC BUILDING TRADES COUNCIL

    (This information furnished by John Mohlis, Columbia Pacific Building Trades Council.)


    Argument in Favor

    SCHOOL FUNDING FOR EVERY OREGON
    PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICT

    As an Oregon public school teacher I support measure #75. Public schools are the life blood of Oregon’s future and our schools are in need of funding to prepare the next generation of productive citizens and, of course, future taxpayers. I wish we did not need to rely on gaming revenue for school funding, but we as a state already made that decision. So let’s make the best of it.

    Schools throughout Oregon are in need of additional funding to reverse the trend of eliminating school programs, trimming school calendars, and compromising the education our students deserve. Measure #75 will generate nearly $75 million of dedicated revenue to Oregon’s schools each year the entertainment center/casino is in full operation. All students in Oregon will benefit, regardless of where they live and attend school.

    Measure #75 is not the total answer, but it is an investment in the right direction and it does not require any taxpayer dollars to get us there. Please join me in voting yes on Measure #75.

    To find out how much new revenue will be going to your local school district, go to www.GoodForOregon.org

    Tony Crawford
    Teacher, Canby

    (This information furnished by Tony Crawford.)


    Argument in Favor

    MAKE UP YOUR OWN MIND on MEASURE 75!
    Historically, gaming means
    MORE REVENUE FOR STATE LOTTERIES

    In the discussion about bringing competitive gaming to Oregon, numerous reports have speculated about what will or won’t happen to the Oregon State Lottery. Fortunately, we don’t have to try and predict the future based on wild guesses: We can look at what’s already happened in other states that have benefited from gaming.

    A recent study by Spectrum Gaming Group compared states that had recently allowed gaming to states that had not.

    AMONG “CASINO STATES”: (4.3% growth)

    Average lottery growth 2000-2005 (0.6% population growth)

    AMONG “NON-CASINO STATES”: (4.0% growth)

    Average lottery growth 2000-2005 (0.9% population growth)

    So, even with less population growth, states that had recently allowed competitive gaming saw more lottery growth than states that had maintained their ban.

    Each state will have a unique experience. What will make the difference is whether the state and the gaming operators work together. The Spectrum study notes that:

    “…if casino operators develop and follow through on crossmarketing strategies designed to boost lottery sales, there will be an increased potential of actual growth in lottery sales as a result.”

    OTHER STATES
    South Dakota: State Lottery officials say that casinos and the lottery do not compete and actually “complement each other.”

    West Virginia: State Lottery officials stated that the lottery and the private gaming coexisted well and that there was “no competition.”

    New Jersey: Interestingly enough, four of the top five lottery retailers in New Jersey in the 2000s were casinos, which aren’t required to sell lottery products but ended up being top marketers to out of state visitors.

    Make up your own mind!
    See other examples and read the entire Spectrum study –
    with methodology and analysis.
    http://www.goodfororegon.org/new/documents/Spectrum_Study.pdf

    More information at
    www.GoodForOregon.org

    Matt Rossman, Chief Petitioner
    Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioner
    Good For Oregon Committee

    (This information furnished by Matthew Rossman and Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioners, Good for Oregon Committee.)


    Argument in Favor

    A Taxable Casino and Entertainment Center Will
    Attract Investment in Oregon.

    The opposition wants you to believe that “foreign investors” are behind this measure. Why? Because they are worried about competition from a taxable, non-smoking casino that attracts tourists to Oregon by providing family fun.

    When complete, the site at an abandoned racetrack in Wood Village will be the new home to a 3D movie theater, bowling alley, water park, shops, and a hotel.

    The idea was conceived by two Oregonians who set out to help schools, and who have worked for four years on a solid business plan that is attracting investors from around the world.

    Investors have already committed $250 million to build the entertainment center and casino in Wood Village. They are investing their own money, not asking for taxpayer dollars.

    Oregon needs investment that creates jobs
    and improves our economy.

    A YES VOTE SAYS THAT OREGON IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS.

    A no vote sends the message that investment in Oregon isn’t welcome. We can’t afford that.

    Unlike Oregon’s nine existing casinos, this one would pay taxes, just like the rest of Oregon’s businesses. They’re not asking for special status.

    Competition is good, and adding a taxable casino will attract even more tourists to Oregon. They will come for gaming, and while they are here, they will visit the coast, go to the zoo, ski, dine out, shop, see music, and spend money that helps our economy.

    Learn more about the local Oregonians, building trades unions, and businesses supporting a taxable casino in Wood Village online at GoodforOregon.org/people.php

    Also available on the website is a study by Oregon-based economist Bill Reid, detailing the economic benefits of the taxable casino: GoodForOregon.org/news.php

    YES, OREGON NEEDS INVESTMENT AND JOB CREATION.

    YES ON 75!

    Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioner
    Matt Rossman, Chief Petitioner
    Good For Oregon Committee

    (This information furnished by Matthew Rossman and Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioners, Good for Oregon Committee.)


    Argument in Favor

    A TAXABLE CASINO WILL PUT DOLLARS DIRECTLY
    INTO CHILDREN’S CLASSROOMS

    I don’t gamble and I’m not very excited about the fact that we currently pay for our schools with gaming dollars from the lottery.

    Nevertheless, as a parent with two children in Oregon’s public schools, I am supporting Measure 75.

    In order to stabilize school funding, we need committed revenue, and we need it every year. The lottery is already declining. A taxable casino will diversify the gaming revenue our kids depend on.

    The state needs more money for schools without raising taxes again. We can’t afford to gamble on the next generation of Oregonians. We must provide the school days, curriculum, programs, and teachers to ensure that they compete in a quickly changing world.

    We can’t allow one more day to be cut, one more program to be removed, or one more teacher to be laid off.

    The entertainment center and casino will generate jobs and income taxes that help schools and point us toward an economic recovery. It will also provide dedicated money, every year, to every classroom in Oregon.

    And it won’t cost Oregon taxpayers a single dime.

    Measure 75 will not solve all the state’s economic problems or its education funding challenges. But it can and will make a difference. Measure #75 can be the determining factor in whether a community keeps or loses teachers.

    I’m asking you to consider the impact on the next generation of Oregon workers and leaders. They are in the classrooms today, and they need our help.

    Please vote yes on Measure 75.

    Rebecca Rasmussen
    Parent
    Tualatin

    (This information furnished by Rebecca Rasmussen.)


    Argument in Favor

    HARD WORKING FAMILIES NEED YOUR YES VOTE ON
    MEASURE 75

    The men and women who build the roads, schools, bridges, office buildings and houses in Oregon are hurting for work. In some building trade sectors, 50% of the workers can’t find a job. And they’re not the only ones struggling; so are their families, their communities, and our economy.

    Voting yes on Measure 75 will give hope to hard working families and open the door to economic prosperity for every Oregon community.

    Measure 75 asks voters to support an entertainment center and casino in Wood Village.

    If approved, the Entertainment Center and Casino could bring:

    • More than 5,000 union construction jobs,
    • Over $220 million in wages for construction workers, and
    • Over $160 million in wages for other workers.

    Construction alone could bring $380 million of additional economic activity into the economy. This tax-paying casino could bring much needed business to all Oregonians, including those who work in retail, manufacturing, and health services, to name a few.

    Measure 75 represents a real lifeline to Oregonians who currently can’t find work. These new construction jobs will open up opportunities, and will serve as a bridge for working Oregonians who need to support their families while the economy begins to recover and our country starts to build again.

    Join me, and other Building Trades Councils, to help hardworking families get back on their feet. Vote Yes on Measure 75.

    John Mohlis

    (This information furnished by John Mohlis.)


    Argument in Favor

    Measure 75 Opens the Door to Prosperity

    I’m a resident and a mom here in Wood Village, and I’m supporting Measure 75.

    Everyone in Oregon knows the economy is terrible. Jobs are scarce, and our public schools are making significant cuts. Measure 75 will bring thousands of construction jobs and 2,500 permanent jobs to our community. Those jobs will average $35,000 per year and will include health benefits. And all this will happen without increasing taxes.

    We desperately need this influx of jobs and the economic boost they will bring to east Multnomah County. The proposed entertainment center will bring out-of-state visitors - and their money - to Oregon.

    Our local businesses will prosper, and we will be able to transform east Multnomah County into a community that we can be proud of – with good schools and good services for all our citizens, especially children and seniors.

    We already depend on gambling dollars to pay for schools. Unfortunately, the lottery just isn’t enough. We need this $250 million investment in Oregon’s future. Once the entertainment center is built, we will be able to use it’s many amenities. Furthermore, it will provide revenue for not just us, but for every school district and every county in the state.

    In addition to raising nearly $150 million in revenue for schools and community services in every corner of Oregon, the center will pay more than $25 million in state and local taxes, including income taxes, property taxes and occupancy taxes.

    Here in Wood Village, we will have a separate vote to approve the entertainment center. That means we will have another opportunity to voice any concerns that affect our local community specifically. Right now, you can help yourself and your community by voting yes on measure 75.

    Thank you,

    Katy Laszlo
    Wood Village

    (This information furnished by Katy Laszlo.)


    Argument in Favor

    LOTTERY LOSS CLAIMS MISINFORMED;
    STATE LOSS CLAIMS FALSE

    The Secretary of State’s Financial Impact Statement in this voter pamphlet relies on government economists who do not understand basic consumer gaming behavior. As a result, they overstated projected lottery losses.

    Claims that the measure would cause the “lottery sky” to fall are in stark contrast to empirical research that demonstrates the opposite. In fact, the introduction of a destination entertainment casino has not historically impacted long-term lottery revenue.

    Most states see a significant increase in lottery funds immediately following the opening of similar casino operations. In the worst case, some states have seen modest decreases in lottery revenues, while total gaming activity and revenues to the state increased significantly.

    THE EXAMPLE FROM OREGON: DESPITE THE
    INTRODUCTION OF NINE TRIBAL CASINOS, OREGON’S
    LOTTERY REVENUE CONTINUES TO GROW,
    WITH LITTLE IMPACT FROM THE CASINOS.

    According to the lottery tracking study, 64% of video lottery players play at “convenience facilities” within 2.8 miles of home, while 11% play within 4.6 miles of work. A destination casino will attract tourists and people looking for a “gaming experience.”

    In other words, destination entertainment casinos attract a different market share than video lottery players. They are uniquely positioned to expand an underserved market, leading to higher participation in the lottery.

    CASE IN POINT: After introducing gaming in Deadwood and retail video lottery terminals in 1991, South Dakota saw video lottery revenue increase 119 percent from 1991-1994. Casino revenue in Deadwood increased 132% during the same time period. According to lottery officials, both have coexisted quite well over the years.

    Your YES vote on Measure 75 provides dedicated monthly revenue to every Oregon public school district and every Oregon county.

    Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioner
    Matt Rossman, Chief Petitioner
    Good For Oregon Committee

    (This information furnished by Bruce Studer and Matthew Rossman, Chief Petitioners, Good for Oregon Committee.)


    Argument in Favor

    United Food and Commercial Workers Union Local 555
    Supports Measure 75

    Hard-working Oregonians are hard-pressed to find work in this depressed economy. In the last year, the Portland Metro region alone has lost more than 50,000 jobs. With high unemployment and higher under-employment, too many members of our community can’t find work.

    The UFCW Local 555 can see that Oregon’s economy is struggling. And we believe Measure 75 can help.

    Measure 75 supports the vision for a taxable casino in Wood Village, Oregon. This family entertainment resort would bring jobs, investments, and a much needed jump-start to our economy.

    With businesses and families from Portland to Pendleton feeling the pain, we need the investment a taxable casino can bring to Oregon.

    A taxable casino can get our economy moving forward. New jobs will bring new consumers to our small businesses and grocery stores, which will need to hire new employees to keep up with demand.

    With a Yes vote on Measure 75, Oregon could see 5,000 construction jobs and 2,500 new full-time jobs that will average $35,000 a year and include health insurance. Also, 25% of the casino’s gross revenue, about $150 million a year, would go to every County and K-12 school district in the state.

    A Yes vote on Measure 75 says, “I support schools and jobs, and I want to move our economy forward.”

    UFCW Local 555 encourages you to Vote Yes on Measure 75

    United Food and Commercial Workers Union, Local 555

    (This information furnished by Jeff Anderson, United Food and Commercial Workers Union Local 555.)


    Argument in Favor

    History of the Measure from the Chief Petitioners

    Legalized gaming has a long history in Oregon, beginning with legalized horse racing in 1931. Back then, racetracks could be found in all of Oregon’s largest cities. Their popularity increased for the next 50 years.

    In 1984, Oregon voters approved a law authorizing the stateowned and state-run lottery. The lottery vote also established, for the first time, Oregon’s legislative ban on casinos.

    Beginning in 1992, following passage of the Federal Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988, the State exempted Oregon’s nine federally recognized tribes from the casino ban.

    Three years later, in 1995, voters approved adding public education to the list of programs funded by the lottery. Today, the Oregon Lottery provides a significant portion of K-12 schools’ resources. Since voters passed an indoor smoking ban, lottery revenues have declined rapidly.

    Schools can’t depend on the lottery alone.

    Starting in 2006, we, the chief petitioners of this Measure, began thinking about a way to help schools without asking for more taxpayer dollars. We started planning an entertainment resort, including a taxable casino that gives money directly to the classroom, to provide a fun place for Oregonians and tourists to visit and to significantly boost our economy.

    Over the past four years, our plan has improved in response to our conversations with Oregon citizens.

    We are dedicated to making this vision a reality, and we need your help,

    We want the whole state to benefit by improving k-12 public education and raising money for every county in Oregon. And we’re not asking any for taxpayer dollars.

    Your Yes vote on this measure will help us invest in Oregon, create jobs, and give money to every public school district and every county in Oregon.

    Thank you,

    Bruce Studer and Matt Rossman

    Chief Petitioners

    (This information furnished by Bruce Studer and Matthew Rossman, Chief Petitioners, Good for Oregon Committee.)


    Argument in Favor

    AN UNEMPLOYED OREGONIAN URGES A YES ON 75

    Dear Neighbor,

    I am a construction worker by trade.

    I have been part of a workforce that has helped build Oregon. This has been fulfilling work that has supported my family. It hasn’t made us rich, but it has been enough to raise a family on, and that’s enough for me.

    But now, with the economy falling apart, we have virtually stopped repairing our schools, stopped replacing our crumbling bridges, and stopped building new homes.

    Work has been increasingly hard to find and I, and many other workers, have been making ends meet with odd jobs. Even then, we find ourselves unemployed for big chunks of the year.

    Our job is building, and when the building stops, we stop being able to make a living.

    Measure 75 is a chance to bring thousands of constructions jobs to Oregon.

    It wouldn’t cost the taxpayers a dime, and $250 million would be immediately invested to build a casino entertainment center, creating thousands of construction jobs during the building phase and 2,500 permanent jobs when it opens. This is the opposite of a bailout – the investors just need our permission to invest their own money in our communities.

    This is one of the largest private construction jobs proposed in years. An infusion of money that large into Oregon’s economy will have a ripple effect, creating all kinds of jobs for construction workers like me, and also for suppliers and other nearby businesses.

    Help put your neighbors back to work. Our work is now in your hands.

    Vote Yes on Measure 75.

    Sincerely,

    James Pritchard
    Portland

    (This information furnished by James Pritchard.)


    Argument in Favor

    Wood Village Voters Have the Final Say;
    Still Need Your Yes Vote

    Dear Voter:

    I am a resident and homeowner in Wood Village, and I am supporting Measure 75. Why? Because I want the old dog racing track to be turned into a new entertainment center including a water park, hotel, 3D theaters, concert hall, bowling alley, restaurants and a taxable casino.

    Over the past decade, I have watched the Multnomah Kennel Club fall apart. Today, it is an eyesore, and it generates nothing but weeds.

    So when I heard that someone wanted to fix it up and put folks to work there, I got excited. Here in Wood Village, we don’t have many jobs and we have almost no industry. This project will create enough jobs to permanently employ over 2,000 people in family wage jobs with benefits. Measure 75 would give us an opportunity to turn an eyesore into economic opportunity.

    The new development would also pay taxes to the city, county and state, something other casinos in Oregon don’t do. That would help fix our roads and sidewalks and keep more local police on duty.

    A Yes vote on Measure 75 will help my community by bringing in much needed taxes and new family wage jobs. It will also help your community, because this measure requires the casino to pay 25% of its gaming money to every school district, every county, and the top 10 cities in the state.

    My neighbors and I in Wood Village have the final say in whether the casino is built in our city. We need your support, too, as both the statewide and local measures must pass for the project to move forward.

    I hope you will join me in voting yes on Measure 75. Help bring jobs to Oregon and more money to the classroom.

    Yours truly,

    Gary Lee Moore, Jr.
    Wood Village, Oregon

    (This information furnished by Gary Lee Moore Jr.)


    Argument in Favor

    TAXABLE CASINO WILL MAKE ANNUAL DISTRIBUTION TO EVERY OREGON COUNTY
    When fully operational, the annual distribution to every Oregon county and the 10 largest cities, is projected to be as follows:

    Counties
    Baker - $190,000
    Benton - $502,000
    Clackamas - $4,394,000
    Clatsop - $438,000
    Columbia - $560,000
    Coos - $730,000
    Crook - $314,000
    Curry - $247,000
    Deschutes - $988,000
    Douglas - $1,219,000
    Gilliam - $22,000
    Grant - $87,000
    Harney - $89,000
    Hood River - $251,000
    Jackson - $1,198,000
    Jefferson - $263,000
    Josephine - $968,000
    Klamath - $768,000
    Lake - $88,000
    Lane - $2,011,000
    Lincoln - $517,000
    Linn - $1,282,000
    Malheur - $367,000
    Marion - $1,841,000
    Morrow - $145,000
    Multnomah - $4,192,000
    Polk - $796,000
    Sherman - $21,000
    Tillamook - $302,000
    Umatilla - $838,000
    Union - $295,000
    Wallowa - $82,000
    Wasco - $280,000
    Washington - $3,049,000
    Wheeler - $18,000
    Yamhill - $1,102,000

    Top 10 Cities: Corvallis - $502,000; Bend - $988,000;
    Medford - $1,197,500; Eugene - $1,468,000;
    Springfield - $543,000; Salem - $1,840,500;
    Gresham - $622,000; Portland - $3,570,000;
    Beaverton - $1,494,000; Hillsboro - $1,555,000

    Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioner
    Matt Rossman, Chief Petitioner
    Good For Oregon Committee

    (This information furnished by Matthew Rossman and Bruce Studer, Chief Petitioners, Good for Oregon Committee.)

Elections Division, Oregon Secretary of State • 136 State Capitol • Salem, OR 97310-0722