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Measure 73

  • Argument in Opposition

    The American Federation of State County and Municipal Employees Oregon Council 75 urges you to vote NO on Measure 73.

    Measure 73 would create mandatory minimum sentences for a narrow spectrum of criminal offenses, leading to an increase in prison overcrowding, yet doing nothing to prevent these crimes from occurring. Oregon AFSCME Council 75 represents most of the corrections officers in the State of Oregon, as well as other prison workers. From this perspective, it is clear that Measure 73 is not going to help our public safety system. In fact, Measure 73 does nothing to enhance public safety, and makes prisons more dangerous for inmates, corrections officers, and other staff.

    While no one wants drunk drivers on the roads or sex offenders in our neighborhoods, Measure 73 fails to solve those serious problems. Instead of protecting Oregonians, the Measure forces an already over-burdened prison system to take on more offenders - and doesn’t come up with a dime to pay for it.

    Measure 73 is catchy slogan politics that allows Oregon’s paid signature-gathering machine to continue throwing things in front of voters without regard for the burdens placed on the Oregon AFSCME Council 75 men and women, and other public employees are the folks who will have to deal the consequences. Oregon AFSCME Council 75 asks you to look beyond the appealing slogan and consider whether this is how Oregon’s prisons should be managed. Let’s work together and create solutions that make sense.

    Please vote NO on Measure 73.

    (This information furnished by Joseph E Baessler, Oregon AFSCME Council 75.)


    Argument in Opposition

    PARTNERSHIP FOR SAFETY AND JUSTICE

    IS VOTING NO ON MEASURE 73

    MEASURE 73 IS THE WRONG SOLUTION TO
    A SERIOUS PROBLEM

    This measure is so vague and poorly written it would require 25 year prison sentences for teens who pass along sexually suggestive images by email or text message. These sorts of youthful mistakes should have accountability, but Measure 73 has unintended consequences that go too far.

    Measure 73 says it’s focused on “repeat offenders,” but it could be used to impose long mandatory sentencing on someone going before the judge for the first time, even if the accused is a minor.

    LONGER SENTENCES AT A JUDGE’S DISCRETION ARE THE
    BEST WAY TO PROTECT OUR COMMUNITIES

    Mandatory minimum sentencing schemes like “three strikes and you’re out” have been terrible failures. Courts need the discretion to best protect our communities and make sure the sentence fits the crime. Measure 73 imposes a one-size-fitsall approach that’s the wrong solution.

    This measure is so poorly written it lumps together two entirely different crimes that have nothing to do with each other – drunk driving and sex crimes. This is a trick by Kevin Mannix, who continues to use Oregon’s initiative process for his own political and economic profit.

    MEASURE 73 IS AN UNFUNDED MANDATE
    THAT OREGON CAN’T AFFORD

    This measure will cost up to $60 million a budget cycle once it is fully implemented, at a time when Oregon is battling a serious fiscal crisis. We are deeply concerned about Measure 73 taking money away from critical services like schools, healthcare and needed public safety programs. Too much has been cut already.

    MEASURE 73 WILL NOT MAKE US SAFER—OREGON NEEDS
    REAL SOLUTIONS

    Measure 73 is the wrong solution that will seriously threaten our schools, healthcare and important public safety programs like the Oregon Youth Authority, court-supervised addiction treatment, and victim services.

    JOIN PARTNERSHIP FOR SAFETY AND JUSTICE IN VOTING
    NO ON MEASURE 73

    www.NoOnMeasure73.com

    (This information furnished by David Rogers, Partnership for Safety and Justice.)


    Argument in Opposition

    Oregon Educators Ask for Your NO Vote on Measure 73

    MEASURE 73 IS ANOTHER UNFUNDED MANDATE

    This measure is another unfunded mandate that will cost hundreds of millions of dollars – money that will be taken away from our schools and other critical programs – when too much has been cut already. Now is not the time to be tying up money for one program at the expense of our schools.

    OREGON’S KIDS CANNOT AFFORD MEASURE 73

    Our job is to make sure all of Oregon’s kids have the opportunity to access a quality education. In these tough economic times, our schools are already facing shortened school years and increased class sizes. We cannot afford to divert another dollar away from Oregon’s classrooms.

    MEASURE 73 IS THE WRONG SOLUTION TO A SERIOUS PROBLEM

    The measure is vague, poorly written and is filled with unintended consequences. It is supposed to punish repeat offenders, but could easily be used to impose mandatory minimum sentencing on someone going before a judge for the very first time – even if the accused is a minor who is only 15 years old.

    MEASURE 73 SHORTCHANGES OUR KIDS’ EDUCATION

    Oregon is already facing a $2 billion deficit – we can’t afford to take more money away from our classrooms. Investing in education is the key to growing our economy and is the best tool we have in preventing crime. By investing in our public schools on the front-end, we end up saving money in incarceration costs over the long term.

    Please join the 48,000 members of
    The Oregon Education Association

    VOTE NO on MEASURE 73

    (This information furnished by BethAnne Darby, The Oregon Education Association.)


    Argument in Opposition

    FORMER PROSECUTORS FROM ACROSS OREGON
    OPPOSE MEASURE 73

    Measure 73 is Poorly Written and
    Filled with Unintended Consequences

    As former prosecutors, we are concerned this measure is vague and so poorly written that it lumps together two entirely different crimes that have nothing to do with one another. M73 is misleading. It says one thing, but does another.

    M73 is supposed to only punish repeat offenders for some crimes, but could also require mandatory minimum sentencing for someone who comes before the court for the first time—including when the accused is only 15 years old. Even if someone has never been in trouble before, M73 could force courts to impose a 25-year mandatory prison sentence.

    Measure 73 Significantly Erodes Fairness in
    Our Justice System

    As former prosecutors, we believe that for our justice system to remain strong, we must have checks and balances to ensure justice is tough, fair and--most importantly--keeps our communities safe. No one prosecutor is perfect. Measure 73 significantly jeopardizes the checks and balances upon which we all depend.

    Measure 73 is the Wrong Solution

    This measure is so badly drafted that it could require up to 25-year mandatory minimum sentences for teens who pass along sexually suggestive images by text message or email. These sorts of youthful mistakes should have consequences, but 25 years in prison is too extreme.

    Measure 73: a Poorly Written and Misleading Measure

    Please join us, former prosecutors from across Oregon,
    in Voting NO on Measure 73


    Gregory Veralrud, Lane County

    Valerie Wright, Deschutes/Lincoln County

    Richard E. Forcum, Jefferson County

    Janie M. Burcart, Clatsop/Union/Malheur County

    Andrew Vandergaw, Lake County

    Peter B. Fahy, Lincoln County

    Downing M. Bethune, Multnomah County

    Nancy A. Nordlander, Tillamook/Clatsop County

    Michael Romano, Deschutes/Klamath/Coos County

    www.NoOnMeasure73.com

    (This information furnished by Gregory Veralrud.)


    Argument in Opposition

    Leading Child Advocacy Group Urges
    “No” Vote on Measure 73

    For more than 25 years, Juvenile Rights Project, Inc. has advocated for the needs of Oregon’s at-risk youth and children in the foster care system.

    Vote No -- Measure 73 is Poorly Written

    This measure is so poorly written that it could require 25-year mandatory minimum sentences for teens who pass along sexually suggestive images by text message or e-mail. These sorts of youthful mistakes should have consequences, but 25 years in prison is too extreme.

    Vote No -- Measure 73 is the Wrong Solution

    Measure 73 is being sold as a “get tough” approach for repeat offenders, yet the way it is written could apply to youth appearing before a judge for the first time and result in 25 years behind bars.

    Vote No -- Measure 73 Wastes Resources and Young Lives

    The 15, 16 and 17 year-olds impacted by this measure have some of the lowest re-offense rates compared to adults or other types of troubled teens, and M73 will deny teens access to treatment services when they are sent to adult prisons.

    Vote No -- Measure 73 is Filled with Unintended Consequences

    Under Oregon’s one-size-fits-all prison sentencing scheme, more low risk offenders are incarcerated, making it less likely that kids will be successfully rehabilitated and re-enter society as contributing citizens. If M73 passes, Oregonians will be stuck with the unintended consequences for years to come—and with the multi-million dollar price tag.

    Measure 73 is poorly written.

    Measure 73 has unintended consequences that could destroy young lives.

    Measure 73 is the wrong solution and wastes limited public resources in the process.

    Please Join Juvenile Rights Project, Inc. in Voting “NO” on 73

    (This information furnished by Mark McKechnie, MSW, Executive Director, Juvenile Rights Project, Inc.)


    Argument in Opposition

    THE OREGON ALLIANCE FOR RETIRED AMERICANS
    IS VOTING NO ON MEASURE 73

    The Oregon Alliance for Retired Americans strongly supports policies that build safe and healthy communities. That is why we are voting NO on Measure 73.

    Oregon can’t afford Measure 73

    Measure 73 is an unfunded mandate that could cost up to $30 million a year, while the state is facing a huge deficit. Critical programs that impact kids, seniors and the disabled are being threatened. We’re voting NO on Measure 73 to protect vital services such as, healthcare, schools, and human services.

    Measure 73 is the wrong solution

    Driving under the influence is a serious problem but Measure 73 doesn’t offer real solutions. By focusing on prison and reducing access to addiction treatment, we will not break the cycle of drunk driving. Court supervised programs that ensure offenders complete addiction treatment are proven to be successful, but Measure 73 will mean fewer people have access to those programs.

    Oregon doesn‘t need more sentencing gimmicks

    Sentencing gimmicks like “three-strikes-you’re-out” are a miserable failure. Measure 73 proposes new mandatory minimums that tie the hands of courts and forces a one-sizefits- all sentencing structure. This is not an effective way to reduce crime.

    Measure 73 won’t make us safer

    While we all want to hold people accountable if they commit crimes, this measure is the wrong solution. Advocates who work with sexual assault victims say what Oregon really needs is stronger investment in life-saving victim-assistance programs. Measure 73 could jeopardize that funding.

    Oregon needs smart policies that help build safe and healthy communities. Measure 73 sends Oregon in the wrong direction. Measure 73 will further jeopardize already threatened funding for critical senior programs that help the elderly, medically fragile and disabled live independently and with dignity.

    PLEASE JOIN THE OREGON ALLIANCE FOR
    RETIRED AMERICANS IN VOTING NO ON MEASURE 73

    (This information furnished by Gerald S Morris, Oregon Alliance for Retired Americans.)


    Argument in Opposition

    YOUTH CORRECTIONS OFFICERS: MEASURE 73 WILL NOT MAKE US SAFER

    We are the union that represents front-line workers at Oregon Youth Authority facilities across the state.

    Our members work every day with gang members, youth with mental health issues, youth who commit sex crimes, and others who have entered the criminal justice system.

    We urge you to vote NO on Measure 73.

    The critical work that is done in youth corrections to help young people avoid becoming career criminals would be damaged by the passage of Measure 73. Our members make sure that these youth serve their sentences. But we also fight to make sure they are getting the treatment they need so they can turn their lives around. We make a difference in the lives of youth who are at the crossroads between a life of crime and a productive return to our community.

    Already we are short-staffed and are being threatened with the closure of youth corrections facilities – including one that specializes in the treatment of youth sex offenders. Measure 73 is an unfunded mandate that will make our communities less safe by taking money away from programs that work.

    Vote NO on Measure 73. It’s the wrong solution and we cannot afford to pay for this tired sentencing gimmick when we are closing youth corrections facilities.

    Measure 73 ties the hands of criminal courts and forces a one-size-fits-all sentencing approach. From our members’ work with youth in the criminal justice system, we know that one size does not fit all. VOTE NO ON MEASURE 73.

    Measure 73 is an unfunded mandate that would stretch the public safety system beyond the breaking point.

    That is why our union – SEIU Local 503 –
    urges you to VOTE NO ON MEASURE 73.

    (This information furnished by Arthur Towers, Service Employees International Union, Local 503.)


    Argument in Opposition

    THE OREGON COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC AND
    SEXUAL VIOLENCE OPPOSES MEASURE 73

    Sexual violence is a serious problem in Oregon.
    We want this violence to end. That’s why we’re voting NO.

    Measure 73 is an unfunded mandate on Oregon drafted by people who didn’t work with sexual assault service providers.

    The Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence is deeply concerned about the unintended consequences of M73.

    • Domestic and sexual violence services are already severely underfunded and face even more cuts. In 2009, over 19,500 requests for emergency shelter from violence in Oregon couldn’t be met due to inadequate funding.

    • Oregon public safety spending is out of balance. It doesn’t make sense to further jeopardize Oregon’s ability to meet thousands of pleas for help by having increased sentences for DUIIs and fewer than 20 sex offenders a year at a cost of tens of millions, while women’s shelters overflow.

    Oregon already spends over $1.4 BILLION a biennium on incarceration, while the Oregon Domestic and Sexual Violence Services Fund remains severely under-resourced.

    • Sex offenders can already receive sentences longer than the current mandatory minimum. It’s the duty of a wellinformed court to listen to victims and make just decisions.

    • The National Alliance to End Sexual Violence (NAESV) opposes mandatory minimum sentences for sex offenders. They say mandatory minimums have negative consequences that “can result in fewer sex offenders being prosecuted and/or tracked, thus NAESV opposes mandatory minimum sentences.” http://naesv.org/2009/?page_id=87

    • Incarceration is important, but it isn’t the only way to create safety. The more money Oregon spends on incarceration, the less money we can spend on other public safety services—including sexual assault services.

    HELP US END VIOLENCE
    PREVENT MORE BUDGET CUTS TO CRITICAL SERVICES
    JOIN US IN VOTING NO ON MEASURE 73

    (This information furnished by Terrie A. Quinteros, Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence.)


    Argument in Opposition

    Oregon Voices Urges You to OPPOSE Measure 73

    More and more people are recognizing that Oregon needs a common sense approach to public safety. Laws like Measure 73 aren’t based on common sense. They are based on a onesize- fits-all approach to criminal justice that costs our State hundreds of millions of dollars without increasing public safety.

    M73 is not common sense.
    It is badly written and the wrong solution.

    M73 is so badly written that it would apply to people coming before a court for the very first time. It would put teenagers in prison for 25 years for having consensual sexual contact or for “sexting”—sending sexually suggestive images by text message or email. These kinds of youthful mistakes should have consequences, but 25 years in prison is too extreme.

    Spending many millions of taxpayer dollars for a tool
    courts don’t need is not common sense.

    Prosecutors and judges already have the tools they need to deal with the crimes covered by M73. Oregon law requires lengthy mandatory prison sentences for these crimes. Our State is in its worst fiscal crisis in decades, with no end in sight. Yet M73 would cost Oregonians over $100 million in the first five years, and the cost will just keep growing. Let’s use that money for education, critical services, and public safety efforts that would bring real benefits to Oregonians.

    We at Oregon Voices see the impact of mandatory minimum sentences up close. We see how ordinary people, adults and teenagers, suffer through the nightmare of one-size-fits-all criminal laws. Chances are you’ve seen that happen too. Yes, people who make mistakes should be held accountable, and they are -- under current Oregon law. M73 is unnecessary. It is extreme and expensive. It makes no sense.

    Oregon Voices urges you to Vote NO on M73.

    www.oregonvoices.org

    (This information furnished by Gwendolyn Griffith Lieuallen, Oregon Voices.)


    Argument in Opposition

    WE SERVE SEXUAL ASSAULT SURVIVORS AND WE OPPOSE
    MEASURE 73

    Every time someone is sexually assaulted, it’s a tragedy. In Oregon, these tragedies happen far too often and there are ripple effects throughout individuals, families and communities. Oregon must end this violence. But Measure 73 is not the answer.

    Measure 73: DOESN’T ADDRESS ROOT PROBLEMS

    Most sexual violence is committed by someone the survivor knows. Most sexual violence is not reported to the police and even fewer cases will end in a conviction. Holding people accountable in the justice system is important, but it is just one part of a much larger public safety response.

    Measure 73: WON’T HELP MOST SURVIVORS

    Oregon’s domestic and sexual violence programs provide core public safety services. We help thousands of women and children rebuild their lives and we help prevent future violence. Our services are available even if the crime is not reported.

    Measure 73: DOESN’T SUPPORT SERVICES

    Domestic and sexual violence services are already severely underfunded and can’t meet the demand for assistance. In 2009, over 19,500 requests for emergency shelter from violence in Oregon couldn’t be met because programs are underfunded. In order to create public safety, we need to ensure that shelter and safety services are available to everyone who needs them.

    Measure 73: WON’T SAVE MONEY

    Oregon is facing a multibillion dollar deficit in the next budget cycle. Measure 73 would add millions to the deficit. Oregon can’t afford more multi-million dollar sentencing requirements and costly prisons when we’re already turning down thousands of victims asking for help.

    PLEASE JOIN US IN VOTING “NO” ON MEASURE 73!

    Bradley Angle
    Saving Grace: Imagine Life without Violence
    Sexual Assault Support Services
    Rebecca Peatow Nickels, MSW, Executive Director of Portland
    Women’s Crisis Line

    (This information furnished by Maria Paladino, Sexual Assault Support Services.)


    Argument in Opposition

    THE ADDICTION COUNSELOR CERTIFICATION BOARD OF
    OREGON SAYS VOTE NO ON MEASURE 73

    Oregon Needs Real Solutions to Drunk Driving

    There could be some confusion about Measure 73 which creates new mandatory sentencing schemes for two completely unrelated offenses: Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (DUII) and sex offenses. M73 is so poorly written that it lumps together two entirely different crimes.

    Measure 73 will have a huge impact on Oregon DUII. It focuses on new mandatory prison sentences for repeat drunk drivers which has been proven to be an ineffective deterrent.

    Ballot Measure 73 may be “tough” but it’s not smart

    Locking up people for DUII’s doesn’t work. People with alcohol and drug addiction problems have high recidivism rates as soon as they get out of jail. As addiction counselors we know the research shows court supervised treatment programs are the most successful approach to preventing future DUIIs.

    Measure 73 decreases access to addiction treatment and will
    not make our streets safer

    Over the past 10 years, people with “multiple-DUIIs” who completed a specific Oregon-based court-supervised treatment program had a recidivism rate of only 2.3% one year later. That’s significantly lower than those who went to prison. People with repeat DUIIs should be held accountable and that can include incarceration, but imposing longer sentences doesn’t reduce relapses—treatment does.

    Measure 73 hurts families. Over two thirds of people with DUIIs in treatment are employed. Measure 73’s mandatory prison sentences will result in loss of employment. This punishes families, without changing the behavior.

    Oregon Can’t Afford Measure 73

    Ballot Measure 73 will cost taxpayers up to an additional $30 million per year. This is an unfunded mandate. Meanwhile, Measure 73 would reduce access to evidence-based programs that cost less and are more effective in preventing future DUIIs.

    Bottom Line: DUII-Treatment-Courts
    Are Significantly More Effective and Cheaper!

    Please Join the Addiction Counselor Certification Board of
    Oregon and Vote No on Measure 73

    (This information furnished by Eric Martin, The Addiction Counselor Certification Board of Oregon.)


    Argument in Opposition

    THE HUMAN SERVICES COALITION OF OREGON
    OPPOSES MEASURE 73

    The Human Services Coalition of Oregon represents more than 80 individuals and social service providers, mental health & healthcare advocates, child welfare groups, disability groups and senior organizations. We work everyday on the frontlines for Oregon’s most vulnerable and medically fragile people. We do it because we are committed to helping those in need.

    MEASURE 73: HURTS FAMILIES & WORKING OREGONIANS

    DUII is a serious problem, but Measure 73 is the wrong solution. It will hurt families. Over two thirds of people with DUIIs in treatment are employed. Measure 73’s mandatory prison sentences would result in loss of employment. This punishes families, without changing the behavior of the family member with an addiction problem.

    MEASURE 73: AN UNFUNDED MANDATE

    This measure is another unfunded mandate that will cost hundreds of millions of dollars – money that will be taken away from critical services like schools and health care, when too much has been cut already.

    OREGON IS ALREADY FALLING SHORT IN PROVIDING
    CRITICAL SERVICES LIKE HEALTHCARE AND EDUCATION

    Especially in times of economic crisis, it’s critical that we protect the basic services that vulnerable Oregonians rely on. That means:

    --protecting in-home care, which lets seniors and people with disabilities live in their own homes with independence and dignity
    --protecting health care services for 80,000 Oregon children
    --and protecting treatment and supervision programs that help keep our communities safe

    MEASURE 73 IS SOMETHING OREGON JUST CAN’T AFFORD
    …NOW OR IN THE FUTURE

    In times of crisis, our state needs more flexibility to balance the budget. Measure 73 would give us less.

    PLEASE JOIN THE HUMAN SERVICES COALITION OF
    OREGON IN VOTING NO ON MEASURE 73

    (This information furnished by Ryan Fisher, Human Services Coalition of Oregon (HSCO).)

Oregon Secretary of State • 136 State Capitol • Salem, OR 97310-0722
Phone: (503) 986-1523 • Fax: (503) 986-1616 • oregon.sos@state.or.us

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